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Heat advisory issued ahead of dangerous high temperatures

Boston, MA. – July 6:  Travis Leger, 9 of Leominster, cools off in one of the fountains at the Greenway after spending the day on the Freedom Trail with his mom on July 6, 2021 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)
Boston, MA. – July 6: Travis Leger, 9 of Leominster, cools off in one of the fountains at the Greenway after spending the day on the Freedom Trail with his mom on July 6, 2021 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)
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The National Weather Service has issued a Heat Advisory for much of the region.

The National Weather Service’s Boston office tweeted, “Significant early season #summer #heat and humidity arrives this weekend with heat index values of 95-102F on both days. Heat Advisories have been issued for most locations away from the coast. Overnight lows on Sat will struggle to fall below 70.”

The Department of Safety’s Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management urges residents and visitors to take action before a heat emergency.

“Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family, including your pets, from heat-related illness,” said Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director Jennifer Harper. “During extreme heat, stay hydrated and take extra precautions, such as frequent breaks, if you work or spend time outside.”

Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year. Young children and infants, older adults, people with chronic medical conditions and pregnant women are at highest risk for heat-related illness.

Harper offers the following safety tips:

• Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.

• Drink plenty of water, even if you do not feel thirsty.

• Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.

• Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

• Go to a designated public shelter if your home loses power during periods of extreme heat. Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.

• Sign up for NH Alerts to receive emergency information via your mobile and landline phones, including severe weather alerts from the National Weather Service and emergency information from HSEM.

• Check the weather and listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service.

If you must go outside:

• Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

• Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.• Protect your face and head by wearing sunblock and a wide-brimmed hat.

• Limit exposure to the sun.

The National Weather Service office in Gray, Maine, advised that New Hampshire is also at-risk. The areas included in the advisory are Cheshire, Hillsborough and Merrimack counties and interior Rockingham County. Hot temperatures and high humidity are expected to lead to heat index values of up to 97. This is the first time the Gray, Maine, office has had to issue a Heat Advisory in May.

People can learn more at ReadyNH.gov.

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