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Quincy, MA. – March 15: Congressman Stephen F. Lynch talks about the American Rescue Plan as Massachusetts Speaker of the House Ronald Mariano and Quincy Mayor Thomas P. Koch listen at the Great Hall on March 15, 2021 in Quincy, Massachusetts.  (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)
Quincy, MA. – March 15: Congressman Stephen F. Lynch talks about the American Rescue Plan as Massachusetts Speaker of the House Ronald Mariano and Quincy Mayor Thomas P. Koch listen at the Great Hall on March 15, 2021 in Quincy, Massachusetts. (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)
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Municipal coffers around Massachusetts are about to get another infusion of federal money.

Whether they get their American Rescue Plan Act money directly from the U.S. Treasury or through the state’s Executive Office of Administration and Finance, most local governments should be on the lookout for information on securing the second half of their ARPA awards, according to the special director of federal funds for the administration of Gov. Charlie Baker, on Tuesday.

“The first tranche of the local fiscal recovery dollars went out last summer starting in June. And so, as you know, the first tranche — 50% last summer, 50% this summer — we will, in the coming weeks, circulate guidance for municipalities that received those dollars through the commonwealth … we will circulate updated guidance about what you’ll need to do,” Heath Fahle told the Local Government Advisory Commission. “Effectively, it’s updating last year’s information, contact information, et cetera. And then those payments will start to flow.”

Fahle said the release of funds applies to the roughly 300 cities and towns that receive their federal money through the state.

The American Rescue Plan Act provided $3.4 billion in aid to Massachusetts cities, towns and counties through the Coronavirus Local Fiscal Recovery Fund. While the state’s portion of ARPA aid came in one lump sum, the $3.4 billion for local governments was split up in a few ways and did not become available all at once.

For larger communities that get their ARPA money directly from the U.S. Treasury, Fahle said federal officials are “starting to communicate with recipients about how to go about accessing that second tranche of funds.”

“So ‘stay tuned’ is the message, but coming soon,” he said.

Once cities and towns get their ARPA money and start to spend it, they will have to comply with U.S. Treasury reporting requirements. Generally speaking, ARPA money must be committed by the end of 2024 and spent by the end of 2026.

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