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By Jon Bishop

jbishop@nashobapub.com

HARVARD — A lot of people came out to vote in Harvard, but, according to Town Clerk Janet Vellante, that’s normal.

“Harvard tends to turn out for votes,” she said, noting that its totals are higher than average on most elections.

Still, like other towns, voters hit the polls in droves. In total, there were 2,714 votes cast. Harvard has 3,971 registered voters. She said a comparable election was the one held four years ago, which brought out 2,800 voters.

Some people praised how Harvard handles its elections as well as the general number of voters who showed up.

“Voting’s great,” said Ron Ricci. “We have a very efficient system in town.”

Mark Miller called the turnout “great.”

Harvard residents were reluctant to share their thoughts on the election — especially one person, who said that she had a lot of opinions but it would be best not to share them.

But that wasn’t true of everyone.

Joe and Rosemary Theriault said that they’re Republicans.

“We’re pulling for Charlie Baker,” Joe said.

Rosemary said that she found the first question on the ballot, which had to do with the gas tax, “a little confusing.”

The results for the questions were thus: Question 1, which asked voters to keep or scrap the automatic gas tax increases, had 1,251 voting to get rid of the adjustments and 1,286 to keep it as it is. Question 2, which asked voters if they would expand the bottle deposit law, had 1,135 voting in the affirmative and 1,520 to keep it as it is. Question 3 asked voters if they would prohibit casinos in Massachusetts. 1,523 cast votes in the affirmative, while 1,125 voted to keep gambling laws as they are. Question 4, which dealt with sick time, had 1,491 voting in favor of granting sick time, and 1,117 voting in the negative.

Senator Ed Markey won his election with 1,601 votes, and Brian Herr, his opponent, had 981. Democrats Martha Coakley and Steve Kerrigan took Harvard with 1,317 votes, while Charlie Baker and Karyn Polito, who won the overall election, had 1,221. Evan Falchuck and Angus Jennings had 73; Scott Lively and Shelly Saunders had 56; Jeff McCormick and Tracy Post had 11.

Maura Healy won her race for Attorney General with 1,581 votes. Her opponent, John Miller, had 982 votes.

William Galvin won his race for Secretary of State with 1,701 votes. David D’Arcangelo came in second with 729, and Daniel Factor was third with 136.

Deborah Goldberg won election to Treasurer with 1,353 votes. Michael Heffernan came in second with 1,010, and Ian Jackson came in third with 118. Suzanne Bump won the Auditor’s race with 1,352 votes. Patricia Saint Aubin came in second with 982 votes, and MK Merelice came in third with 116. Representative Niki Tsongas won her race and earned 1,692 votes. Ann Wofford came in second with 938 votes. Marilyn Petitto Devaney won the Governor’s Council race with 1,369 votes. Thomas Sheff came in second with 844 votes.