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GROTON — Water chestnuts are an invasive aquatic plant first found in the Pepperell Pond impoundment area of the Nashua River in the late 1990s.

These plants create an impenetrable mat of growth that makes the river inaccessible to boating and fishing. Their growth replaces ecologically critical native plant species. When the dense mats die off in the fall, they sink and decay, which depletes oxygen levels vital to fish, destroying native fish habitat with resulting negative impact on fish populations.

The Nashua River Watershed Association has been working for over a decade to contain this aggressive infestation. The NRWA invites the public to learn more about “Water Chestnuts in the Nashua River” during a free presentation on Thursday, Oct. 23, beginning at 7 p.m. at the NRWA River Resource Center, 592 Main Street (Rt. 119) in Groton.

Martha Morgan, NRWA water programs director, and Kathryn Nelson, NRWA water monitoring coordinator, will present an informative slideshow on the plant’s life cycle, impact on wildlife and efforts to eradicate it in the Nashua River. This is an opportunity to become better informed about this plant and share information on how to prevent its spread and reduce its impact .

This program is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is appreciated for planning purposes.

For info, or to pre-register, contact Morgan at 978-448-0299, or email MarthaM@NashuaRiverWatershed.org.

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We invite you to use our commenting platform to engage in insightful conversations about issues in our community. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable to us, and to disclose any information necessary to satisfy the law, regulation, or government request. We might permanently block any user who abuses these conditions.

Water chestnuts in the Nashua River:
Water chestnuts in the Nashua River:
PUBLISHED: | UPDATED:

GROTON — Water chestnuts are an invasive aquatic plant first found in the Pepperell Pond impoundment area of the Nashua River in the late 1990s.

These plants create an impenetrable mat of growth that makes the river inaccessible to boating and fishing. Their growth replaces ecologically critical native plant species. When the dense mats die off in the fall, they sink and decay, which depletes oxygen levels vital to fish, destroying native fish habitat with resulting negative impact on fish populations.

The Nashua River Watershed Association has been working for over a decade to contain this aggressive infestation. The NRWA invites the public to learn more about “Water Chestnuts in the Nashua River” during a free presentation on Thursday, Oct. 23, beginning at 7 p.m. at the NRWA River Resource Center, 592 Main Street (Rt. 119) in Groton.

Martha Morgan, NRWA water programs director, and Kathryn Nelson, NRWA water monitoring coordinator, will present an informative slideshow on the plant’s life cycle, impact on wildlife and efforts to eradicate it in the Nashua River. This is an opportunity to become better informed about this plant and share information on how to prevent its spread and reduce its impact .

This program is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is appreciated for planning purposes.

For info, or to pre-register, contact Morgan at 978-448-0299, or email MarthaM@NashuaRiverWatershed.org.

Join the Conversation

We invite you to use our commenting platform to engage in insightful conversations about issues in our community. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable to us, and to disclose any information necessary to satisfy the law, regulation, or government request. We might permanently block any user who abuses these conditions.