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TOWNSEND — At the Aug. 27 Planning Board meeting, the board denied a request for waivers to divide a privately owned property on North End Road, citing that the plans were not in compliance with their bylaws.

They voted to extend the deadline for resubmission to their meeting date of Oct. 22.

The decision came after a presentation from Fieldstone Land Consultants representative Michael Ploof on behalf of the owner, Grandview Farm LLC. The owner submitted requests to the board through Fieldstone Land Consultants, asking to divide the current land into five separate lots — four residential lots and one outlying commercial lot to remain undeveloped.

The board detailed several concerns regarding the project.

Ploof’s plan included a common driveway between three of the five lots, and intersecting the remaining two lots. According to the bylaws, a common driveway is only to be considered if the properties have viable frontage, which the board did not feel the lots have.

The bylaws also state that common driveways must serve up to three properties and must enter through the frontage of one of the properties it serves. The driveway in this case would enter the only residential lot that the driveway did not serve.

Beyond the stipulations of the bylaws, the board had concerns that residents would be sacrificing functionality, given the layout of the lots.

“This may be perfectly legal, but it makes absolutely no sense,” said Chairman Jeffrey Peduzzi. “The town will simply not allow buses or plows or anything else to get up that (driveway).”

In addition, the driveway was planned at 999.5 feet. The limit allowed is 1,000 feet.

The board questioned Ploof about why a certain amount of shown farmland wasn’t being utilized to provide more adequate frontage and space for driveways.

Ploof said it was the desire of the landowner to maintain the farmland as undeveloped.

“My design criteria was to save the field,” said Ploof.

Peduzzi credited Ploof for the research he put into the plans and encouraged him to revise his plans and resubmit them.

“I think you did as good a job as you could have under the circumstances. The owners just put restrictions on you that could have been handled better,” he said.

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