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I’m very disappointed that a perfect storm arose in the past two weeks to sink my candidacy for School Committee. If any of three things had occurred differently, I would be campaigning now in hopes of being able to serve Harvard for the next three years.

When I decided to run for School Committee, I knew that I had a problem that would make winning a seat difficult: I would be out of the country for the two weeks preceding the election. Last-minute campaigning, especially participating in debates that are often held in the last two weeks, is very important. As a result, I had hoped that there would be only one other candidate for the two open School Committee positions.

It turned out that two other candidates stepped forward at the town caucus; the race would be contested. However, within days, my problem seemed to be on the verge of disappearing. Selectmen said that they were leaning toward delaying the Annual Town Meeting and the election for at least a month. Unfortunately for me, on March 1, circumstances changed, and the selectmen decided otherwise.

I was nevertheless prepared to move ahead if the two debates could be scheduled prior to my leaving the country. I learned on March 2 that one of the debates could not be so scheduled, and that the date for the other — the one that would draw the most attention –would not be set until March 4. Unfortunately, the election ballot was set to go to the printer on March 3. I felt it was best that if I was to drop out of the race, I should do it on March 3. If I dropped out on the 4th, my name would remain on the ballot, which would confuse voters.

So, today — March 3 — I eliminated myself from the race for School Committee. I’m disappointed; I was excited about the possibility of serving, and in recent months I did a lot of “homework” so I could better understand the schools, the issues, and how the committee works.

I wish the other two candidates (now unopposed), Keith Cheveralls and Susan Mary Redinger, best of luck over the next three years. They will serve Harvard well.

STEVE KENDALL