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DEVENS — A quiet protest against MassDevelopment policy lodged by the residents of Sylvia’s Haven and Sylvia Anthony herself did little to disrupt the 10th anniversary of Devens’ development with the populating of a time capsule and speeches by dignitaries.

Three Haven residents and Anthony were, however, noticeably present 100 yards from a white tent erected on the Devens Common lawn and chairs set out for visitors. The protest attracted the attention of both the press and MassDevelopment Public Relations Director Bonnie Biocchi, who spoke with the picketers.

On Tuesday, Anthony stood between signs that read “Instead of helping the homeless you do nothing but harass” and “What do the homeless have to celebrate today: eviction.”

Anthony explained that a MassDevelopment lawsuit aimed at evicting the residents of Sylvia’s Haven has been in place for four years and that the Haven has filed a counter-suit.

”It’s been total harassment from MassDevelopment for nine years,” she said. “Fifty housing units were given to me under the McKinney Act, and my presence is grandfathered.”

The Haven, 50 former Army enlisted quarters abutting the privately-owned Auman Street area at 8F Adams Circle is shown on proposed MassDevelopment zoning maps to be in a residential area.

”State representatives are giving me a vote of confidence,” Anthony said, “and MassDevelopment has asked each of them to take the $95,000 line item (that funds the Haven) off the budget four years ago.

”Rep. Paul Loscocco (R-Holliston) has put the money back in, and (his bill) was passed to read not less than $100,000 in today’s proposed budget,” Anthony said.

The Haven was formerly known as Life for Little Ones, she said, and has helped roughly 60 to 70 people per year since its inception 20 years ago. The Haven has helped 976 women and children to date.

Anthony said she received a letter giving her the 50 former government housing units and nearby chapel in 1992, prior to the MassDevelopment takeover of Devens from the Massachusetts Land Bank. The Land Bank had helped her move in to the site in 1997.

”I was grandfathered when MassDevelopment formed and they have been harassing me ever since,” Anthony said. “MassDevelopment wants us out, and we’re suing for all the harassment we’ve been through.”