SHIRLEY - Selectmen have approved a license renewal for Insurance Auto Auctions, on Going Road off Route 2A, which caused a stir when it came up earlier this year.

Residents complained about noise, after-hours operation and trucks, trucks, trucks. Car carriers, actually, huge trucks arriving at all hours, parking where they pleased, on the road by IAA's closed gates, on side streets and even blocking people's driveways, they said.

Neighbors agree the business has cleaned up its act, as promised.

Granted earlier this year, provisionally, IAA's license renewal came with a list of conditions and a trial period. Bill Wessels, who complained to the board last year, said he's mostly satisfied with the outcome. "They've ... complied with our agreement," he said. For one thing, there's a security guard on duty at night, he said, citing one of the conditions. And no car haulers come at night anymore, either.

Dan O'Leary, who operates the lot, said IAA no longer accepts cars from large carriers outfitted for more than four vehicles and that prohibition works both ways. No huge trucks in or out.

But they've been seen barreling through Shirley side streets despite local and state rules that limit them to numbered routes only, according to Robert Adam, of Parker Road and Ron Banay, of Center Road, both of whom wrote letters to the board about it. If the trucks are speeding on secondary roadways, residents should call the police, the selectmen said.


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But it's not IAA's fault, O'Leary said.

"We're okay with these conditions," he said. No trucks that carry more than four vehicles are allowed on the lot. But some independent carriers may still head out this way, expecting to pick up wrecks. If they show up at IAA, they are turned away, he said and no transports take place after hours, period.

The IAA website spells out the rules, including operating hours and the four-car carrier limit.

"My guess is, they didn't see the website," Adam said. Or didn't notice the ban on over-size trucks. He suggested tweaking the site so its message is loud and clear.

O'Leary agreed to work on it.