This past Tuesday, Nov. 4, voters in 18 Massachusetts towns and cities spoke up as one for a more open and honest government with a Yes vote on a nonbinding ballot question, supporting Move to Amend.

On the ballot as either Question 5 or Question 6, the question asked: Shall the state representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of a resolution calling upon Congress to propose an amendment to the U.S. Constitution affirming that 1) rights protected under the Constitution are the rights of natural persons only, and 2) both Congress and the states may place limits on political contributions and political spending?

Similar to 2012 when this question appeared on Harvard's ballot, the initiative won on the ballot everywhere it appeared! The Yes votes in Mass. ranged from 68 percent to 77 percent. In addition to Massachusetts, citizens in Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin and Florida voted overwhelmingly for their legislators to pass a constitutional amendment to overturn the U.S. Supreme Court's Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission ruling and declare that only human beings -- not corporations -- are entitled to constitutional rights and that money is not speech and campaign spending can be regulated.

This kind of political agreement does not happen much in America anymore, except when it comes to defending democracy for "We the People."

Regardless of party affiliations and ideological leanings, it is safe to say that we, the people, are fed up with the way things are.


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We're angry, disillusioned and want a level playing field.

We encourage you to check out MovetoAmend.org and lend your support!

Steve and Mary Ellen Miller

Harvard